Double Bill: Humanity Delete – Never Ending Nightmare VS. Megascavenger – Descent of Yuggoth

Humanity Delete - Never Ending Nightmares

Humanity Delete [Sweden]
Never Ending Nightmare
2012
Full Length
Dead Beat Media
Death Metal/Grindcore

Megascavenger - Descent of Yuggoth

Megascavenger [Sweden]
Descent of Yuggoth
2012
Full Length
Selfmadegod Records
Death Metal

There are musicians that are overflowing with inspiration that result in numerous releases of different musical styles under one moniker, though mostly these tend to be of the black metal variant such as Drowning the Light and Benighted in Sodom. Then there are others that form countless number of bands with each releasing slight variances of the same genre, and Rogga Johansson is one such musician. When dealing with Swedish death metal it’s kinda hard to not mention his name. We have already seen his recent release with the horror themed death metal band Revolting, but that was just the beginning of his release streak as he presents the debut full lengths to two more of his bands, Humanity Delete and Megascavenger. So to prevent any overlaps, these two releases shall be dissected simultaneously.

While Revolting‘s Hymns of Ghastly Horror was a rather straightforward style of old school Swedish death metal in the veins of Entombed and NihilistHumanity Delete‘s music attempts to present a slight variation to that old school Swedish death metal sound with the inclusion of some grindcore influences. Sure, the haunting atmosphere that Rogga’s projects are known for are still present, such as the ghastly female vocals on opening track Never Ending Nightmares and the sound samples at the end of Pontianak Part II, but the tracks here are markedly shorter and more in-your-face, with the band’s ferocity often lasting no more than 3 minutes. That d-beat attack on the drums that are so typical of Swedish death metal are still present, though it is taken to a more extreme edge here, with more double bass-pedalled fuelled onslaught that tortures the eardrums of the listeners, and this is perhaps the personal highlight on this release, alternating between punk-styled drumming to full-on death metal attack, often with little or no warning. The riffing even takes a slight Netherlands touch with those on songs like The Eight Fire Narakas being rather similar to what bands like Asphyx would have put out. The guitar solos are on the contrary rather melodic, such as those on Black Oil Defiler (Orang Minyak), not what one would expect from the high octane performance by the band. Rogga’s vocals are also deeper on this release compared to his works on Revolting, bearing a slight resemblance to the excellent growls of vocalists such as Mikael Akerfeldt. What really stood out though are the lyrical themes on Never Ending Nightmare, taking cue from more Eastern folklore, with songs like Pontianak and Black Oil Defiler (Orang Minyak) being some classic examples of horror stories taken from Malay folklore. That said though, the lack of variety in the structures of the song tend to cause the album to start sounding rather predictable after awhile.

Megascavenger on the other hand has the potential of being a more dynamic release, featuring numerous high-profiled death metal personalities such as Dan Swano, Paul Speckmann and Patrick Mameli among many others; an all-star project of sorts I guess. Despite the marked rawness in the production quality on Descent of Yuggoth, one is tricked into thinking of this as a melodic death metal release with the large melodic hooks that are on Nihilisticon, but the brutality sets in soon enough after that, most evidently on the relentless drumming on the album. The guest musicians on the album each give their unique touch to the tracks that they feature in, and this certainly helps in making Descent of Yuggoth a rather interesting album to say the least, with quite a variety of different styles of death metal included, such as Smokescreen Armageddon with that strong presence of the lead guitars. Void of Damnation even brings in a slight doom attitude, with the agonisingly slow pace of the track bringing about an ominous feeling in the listener. The crushing riffs that plague the album also help to give it a heavy atmosphere, causing the listener to almost asphyxiate under that intensity that is in the air.

Though initially I wondered what the reasons for forming different bands playing rather similar styles of music were, upon closer listening to material from Humanity Delete and Megascavenger, it perhaps became somewhat clearer, with each band serving a different purpose, and each band being restricted to performing a particular style of death metal. Obviously, Megascavenger‘s Descent of Yuggoth, with its slew of death metal stars, made for a more spectacular listening experience, though Humanity Delete also managed to cause some serious neck damage with the high energy performance on Never Ending Nightmare.

Humanity Delete on the internet:
Facebook
Dead Beat Media

Megascavenger on the internet:
Selfmadegod Records

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